Archive for the ‘park setting’ Category

 

Family Portrait Photography Penrith Locations

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

I’m always scouting around for great new locations for outdoor family portrait photography in the Blue Mountains and Penrith area.

Many of my clients live in the lower mountains, Penrith, Emu Plains, Glenmore Park and Mulgoa regions so its important for me to have a number of options for locations available at different times of the year depending on the season.

As we move into Autumn and then Winter more of my photo–shoots happen at locations in the lower mountains and Penrith area. One of my favourite spots is River Road Reserve at Emu Plains.

At the moment there are Autumn colours everywhere making for a beautiful backdrop to family photography.

This shoot took place at River Road Reserve and involved grandchildren assembling for some photos for Nanna. The children were great, they got on so well together and they all seemed to enjoy the time together which came through in the shots. Nanna was very pleased!

Boy and girl standing under a tree

Brother and sister trying to look like they like each other

Boy cousins standing under a tree

The Boys!

Young girl cousins together under a tree

The Girls

Cousins together for photo under a tree in Autumn

All the cousins together

Darren Edwards is a professional family portrait photographer specialising in family and corporate photography in the Blue Mountains, Penrith and greater Sydney region.

 

Autumn Colours for your Outdoor Family Portrait

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Autumn in the Blue Mountains is a beautiful time for outdoor family portrait photography.

With the abundance of parks and gardens awash with the colours of Autumn leaves, the backdrops are stunning.

An outdoor family portrait photograph adds that extra special element of being out and amongst nature and more importantly enjoying that time with your family and allowing that joy to shine through the images.

This young family travelled up to the mid mountains to enjoy the early morning sun and Autumn colours for their photo shoot and we had a ball. Their 9 month old boy giggled and laughed and seemed to really enjoy all the attention he was getting from mum and dad.

I tried to incorporate the golden leaves and the morning sun in the shots as much as possible to give the images a nice warm feeling. The morning sun backlighting them really made the leaves glow and become a great feature of the images. This shoot was a nice way to start the day.

Family Portrait outdoors with Autumn colours

Darren Edwards is a professional family portrait photographer servicing the Blue Mountains and greater western Sydney region. With 20 years industry experience and the highest quality products and services your family portrait, newborn, corporate or fine art photograph is in good hands.

Click “Darren Edwards Photography” to see more images, “Commissions” to learn more about our products or “Contact” to make an appointment for your individual commission.

Outdoor Location Family Portrait

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

This outdoor family photo shoot was at a lovely garden setting in the mid Blue Mountains.

With all the rain we’ve been having many of the parks and gardens are quite overgrown making them unusable. This garden was just right and the areas of long grass created a nice effect I think.

This was a fun and relaxed family portrait sitting, the result of a gift voucher one of my valued clients had bought for his sister’s family.

Gift vouchers are a great gift for friends and family, who doesn’t love photos of their kids having a fun time together?

They’re great for things like Mothers Day, Christmas, birthdays and anniversaries.

Darren Edwards Photography is a professional photographic studio based in the Blue Mountains and servicing the greater Sydney and central west region. With 20 years industry experience, outstanding products and value for money, your photographic commission is in good hands.

Click on “Darren Edwards Photography” at the top of the page to see more images or “Contact” to make an enquiry.

The Setting Sun and Outdoor Family Portraits – Blue Mountains family, kids and pets portrait Photographer

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

It was a great relief to welcome the sun back last weekend after all the rain we’d had during the week.

This family portrait photo-shoot took place at one of my favourite parks in the Blue Mountains, its a great location for young families and as the evening approaches the sun sets and helps create beautiful light effects through the trees.

I like to shoot into the sun sometimes to give my subject that back-lit halo effect. I also really enjoy the way the sunlight refracts into streams of light through the leaves on the trees.

On most outdoor family portrait photo-shoots I find there is a 5-10 minute window of opportunity to achieve these back-lit shots as the sun sets, so it is rewarding to see the results in post-production.

I really like these shots, I believe they capture some of the essence of the relationship between these two young children. He was such a gentle older brother as he led his sister around the park and they nattered away to each other lost in their own conversation.

Darren Edwards Photography is a professional photographic studio based in the Blue Mountains and servicing the greater Sydney and central west region. With 20 years industry experience, outstanding products and value for money, your photographic commission is in good hands. 

Click on “Darren Edwards Photography” at the top of the page to see more images or “Contact” to make an enquiry.

Why use a Professional Photographer

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

While we may have a friend with a camera, or good old Uncle Harry or Aunty Betty with their you-beaut camera and lens package to help record our special day, there is a lot to be said for having a professional there to ensure the job is does well.

I recall seeing an advertisement for Kodak film many years ago which had a line that read something like “a great family portrait isn’t expensive, its priceless!”.

Another advertisement Kodak used had words to the effect, “capture the moment now, and enjoy it over and over.”

Photographing a wedding recently I was struck by how many of the guests had their cameras and phones out snapping away at the happy couple as the event unfolded.

I wondered how many of those images would be “up on Facebook” before the end of the reception, shared with friends across the country or across the world.

These days we all have a digital camera of some description, whether it be a digital SLR or a compact camera or even our phone. One way or another we are able to take a photograph and record a moment for posterity.

Many of these images are snapshots or happy-snaps designed to make a quick record of an event and share it with friends or family via Facebook or Flickr, while others are often more considered moments destined for an album or frame.

I recently received this feedback from a client who had commissioned a portrait with her family to give as a gift to their mother for her 60th birthday.

“Just wanted to pass on a huge THANK YOU! The photos were beautiful. My mum cried when she saw them.”

I love being a portrait photographer, sometimes it doesn’t feel like work, especially when the result has such an effect on people.

Getting back to the Kodak advertisement – what makes us cry tears of joy when we see a beautiful family portrait? Moreover what makes a beautiful family portrait, and how do you choose a photographer to create it?

The photographers I’m most influenced by have a gift for seeing a moment before it happens, they have wonderful anticipation for what is about to happen and incredible skill to capture that moment.

These are skills which take years to develop, through experience, knowledge and practice.

Having patience and anticipation helps to capture beautiful moments

I model my own work practice on these principles. I have been photographing people for 20 years and feel I have a keen sense of how people respond to being photographed.

The most difficult part of a good family portrait shoot is creating the right environment for something to happen. I like an outdoor location as I feel it helps this process by providing an open space not enclosed by walls. Out in the elements my clients feel the environment around them, they can explore and be themselves, if its cold they can cuddle into each other, its a physical event.

What follows is anticipation and patience – being ready for that moment goes a long way to producing unique and beautiful images to enjoy over and over.

Tips for Better Photos

Saturday, October 15th, 2011

I like to use outdoor locations for my portrait shoots as I believe it helps create a better working environment and therefore better images.

However it is not as simple as just going down to the local park with your camera and your kids and snapping away. I thought I’d share some tips on how to go about planning a successful photo-shoot.

The right time of day

Choosing the right time of day is a big consideration. This can depend on who you are photographing – whether it be your toddlers or your teenagers or even your partner or pet. Most toddlers “perform” best earlier in the day so might benefit from an early morning shoot.

The “golden hour” is just before sunset when the light conditions are generally considered best for producing wonderful atmosphere. While we would all like to have our photo-shoots at this time one needs to be a little flexible when it comes to youngsters.

Background

When I’m teaching others to use their camera one of the most important elements of composition I like to stress is background – background, background, background! There it is stressed.

Look for clean backgrounds for your shots. This can mean moving yourself or your subject to eliminate that tree branch poking up behind their head, or that telegraph pole or whatever element is going to distract the viewer from enjoying your composition.

Use foliage to frame or border your subject. Sometimes you can use a leafy branch or a tree trunk to create a frame around your subject. Branches and leaves can also make points of interest for your subject to look at or reach for.

If you are using the shade of a leafy tree you might bring your subject out the edge of the foliage and give yourself a nice deep, dark background by exposing for the subjects face and therefore under-exposing the shade under the tree.

Use foliage to frame your subject

Light

Be aware of dappled light falling through leaves on trees. Turning your subject to face away from the sun will prevent them having dappled spots of light and shade on their faces.

As the sun sets you can use the soft light much like a lamp or strobe light by positioning your subject relative to the light and giving them that golden glow from the sunset. Remember to look at where shadows are falling on the face to keep it sympathetic.

Advanced users might think about using a reflector or diffuser to further control the light outdoors.

Dress 

One of the most common questions I’m asked is what should we wear? Dress for the season is my best advice. Out in the park you can all wear jeans and a smart collared shirt. Toddlers look great in jeans and button-up shirts for the boys and long floral dresses for the girls. Most of all remember to wear something warm if the season dictates it. There is nothing worse than having your subject all hunched up and shivering because they haven’t worn warm clothes.

Camera settings

Set a shallow depth of field with a low aperture to help isolate your subject from the background. Not only does this create a blurry background it can help “clean-up” that background. Remember how important background is?

Keep your shutter speed high enough to stop the action. Kids like to wriggle and run around so you’ll need a fast enough shutter speed to capture that movement without your shot looking blurry or out of focus.

Shallow depth of field can isolate your subject from the background

Make an event of it

Take a picnic with you! Try to make the visit to the park about having fun with your family not just about having some photos taken. If you put too much emphasis on the event and the photos this can often lead to disappointment when you struggle to get “that shot” you have in mind.

Your photography should be about enjoying your craft or hobby, so if you don’t get the shot you want today, you can always come back next week and when you do come back you’ll be armed with all the knowledge you earned the first time.